Best Practices To Manage Outsource Web Development

Ask any entrepreneur about outsourcing and they probably have a horror story to share. Hear the founders of 3 development shops (Startup Giraffe, Happy Fun Corp and MojoTech) discuss how to avoid common mistakes, bad habits and heartbreak. How to structure a relationship, establish a scope of work, manage work flow and more.

WHO:
Amit Klein Founder Startup Giraffe
Duncan Shaw Managing Director MojoTech
Ben Schippers co-Founder Happy Fun Corp

WHEN: 7PM Monday November 11th
WHERE: General Assembly
902 Broadway (4th Floor)

PAST EVENTS

3rd Anniversary: Founders@Fail’s First Guests, The General Assembly Team

3 years ago Matt and Brad kicked off the very first Founders@Fail with stories of their (mis)adventures in startup land. While most of us spent our college years doing keg stands in dirty basements, Matt and Brad already demonstrated an entrepreneurial flair, selling “gently used” furniture from the Yale scrap heap by pitching it as “historic works from the Yale archives.” After exhausting Yale’s supply of furniture the pair founded GoCrossCampus, a real world game of Risk that exploded across college campuses in 2007 only to crash under the combined stress of crashing servers and pressure to monetize. Since then, the pair have built General Assembly into a global community stretching from LA to Berlin. Hear lessons learned along the way at a very special Three Year Anniversary of Founders@Fail.

The Education of A Founder: CourseHorse’s Katie Kapler & Nihal Parthasarathi

After winning NYU’s Business Plan competition, CourseHorse’s co-founder Katie Kapler joked that “she had three jobs at the same time: a full-time entrepreneur, a part-time worker, and a full-time contestant.” Life as a founder is a schizophrenic tsunami of to-do’s and responsibilities. When you don’t have enough money, time or employees how do you evaluate:

Which features to build?
How to spend your tiny marketing budget?
Whether to outsource or hire key roles?

Learn how Katie and co-founder Nihal Parthasarathi made these hard choices en route to building CourseHorse into an education platform that hosts 20,000 classes monthly.

Peter Sullivan: Tripl

If you’ve read any tech press in the past year, you’ve heard about the Series A drought. Tripl serves as a humble reminder of the consequences. In just 2 years the company built a beautiful site, raised $700k, graduated from the DreamIt Accelerator with a surge of buzz, flirted with an acquisition by Facebook and slowly watched their bank account dwindle. With steady, but not meteoric growth the company lost heat as investors turned their attention elsewhere. Hear Tripl’s founder Peter Sullivan discuss the high’s, low’s and lessons learned through the process.

Seth Bannon: Amicus

Over the years I have learned 3 things about our next speaker Amicus founder Seth Bannon:

1) Whenever I think I’ve put in a long day, Seth just caught his second wind and has 4 more hours of productivity in him.
2) There’s a reason he’s better at chess than me.
3) His lexicon of esoteric quotes rivals that of Wikipedia.

Hear Seth break down lessons learned while building Amicus, a platform that makes it easy for non profits to turn their supporters into fundraisers and advocates. For a preview, check out Seth’s favorite hiring hacks.

Seung Bak: DramaFever Founder

Starting a online television network with no content and absolutely no experience in television is enough to make even the most persistent founder begin to sweat. It may have taken Seung Bak 8 months to land his first licensing deal for DramaFever, but since then he’s built a platform that attracts more than 1.5 million users per month. DramaFever, the streaming service for subtitled Asian television, counts Youtube co-founder Steve Chen, AMC, and the family behind Televisa and Univision as its investors. Seung didn’t come from the hype of the startup scene, he and his co-founder saw an opportunity, bootstrapped their business, and went after a market.

Hear how he and his team have gone from being a humble startup to the largest distributor of Korean television in the US and Canada.

Jon Axelrod

Few industries have fought innovation as fiercely as the Music Business. Our next speaker Jon Axelrod has spent the past decade building startups in the space. He experienced the pre-bubble rocket ship as founder of Music123 in 1999 and the fallout post Napster. Undeterred, he went on to found MusicGremlin which was acquired by SanDisk in 2008. He currently serves as Managing Director of Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator in NYC. He’ll be discussing the high’s, low’s and lessons learned when dealing with the music business.

How To Build A Community One Customer At A Time

Panelists include:
Mark Peter Davis (Founder, Kohort)
Amanda Hesser (Founder, Food52)
Kathryn Minshew (Founder, The Muse)
Jen Rubio (Head of Social, Warby Parker)
Startups love to talk CAC, CLV, and CTR. In the middle of all that transactional jargon it’s easy to forget that it takes more than a sale to build a relationship with your customers. How do you create a community of passionate, loyal evangelists? Building virality into your platform and creating triggers to catalyze engagement requires thoughtful strategy and technology. Here how these entrepreneurs approach the challenge.

Corey Capasso (Nomi)

Corey Capasso (Spinback)
Most of us stopped eating Play-doh around age 6. But back in those glory days, who could resist red’s flavor? I kid, but Corey Capasso turned that bad habit into big business by inventing flavored plastics. If you play any contact sport, you’ve tasted his product in your mouthguard. Capasso went on to launch Exchange Hut, Spinback (sold to Buddy Media) and Nomi. Hear this serial entrepreneur discuss the high’s, low’s, and lessons learned through his career.